Computer Forensics Topics

Is ‘better’ what gets you the best job? Is ‘better’ what protects the integrity of the field? In reviewing job postings by both private and public sector employers over the past few months, it seems as though a computer forensics degree is becoming more important to employers than it has been in the past. The trend seems to be that employers are looking for a combination of: (1) a technical degree (computer science, computer forensics, information systems security, or engineering); (2) forensic or specific technical certifications; and (3) experience. Now, let’s add a little bit of fun to the debate. Where do I get my degree? What degree do I get? If I go for a certification, which is the best? Give us your two cents!

Private Investigator Licensing

Some states now mandate that computer forensic examiners be a licensed private investigator before they perform computer forensic examinations, particularly where the evidence could be used in a court within the state. This is a hot debate in the computer forensics field. Computer forensic examiners generally do not agree with the mandate, viewing the new mandate to license as private investigators to be an uninformed decision that not only impacts examiners working within the state, but also impacts examiners conducting examinations of evidence for use in another state where the licensing provisions are different. What do you think about these new licensing regulations, pro or con?

What are the newest challenges facing practicing examiners?

Many examiners will agree that the field of computer forensics, from both a legal and technical standpoint, changes on a near daily basis. Courts, policy makers, and software and hardware manufacturers force examiners to adjust to a changing computer forensic landscape frequently, oftentimes before the examiner has adjusted to the last new challenge.

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